Beach Access Upgrade Seaford

We're upgrading the beach access path at Seaford.

The beach access path located at the Aldam Road/Esplanade car park in Seaford requires an upgrade to ensure the safety of all users. The upgrade will also further protect the surrounding environment and includes planting more native vegetation.

Work is due to commence in early 2020 and will take around four weeks to completed. The upgrade work will consist of:

  • Installing new hand railing
  • Bitumising the current path where required
  • Installing a low rock edging on the dune side of the path to reduce clay and sand washing onto the path
  • Installing a set of concrete steps at the bottom of the path for smooth access to the beach
  • Planting native vegetation

At times during the construction, the path will be closed and users will be advised to use alternate beach access, located a short walking distance further south.

For more information, please view the concept plan located in the document library. You can also ask a question about this project below.

We're upgrading the beach access path at Seaford.

The beach access path located at the Aldam Road/Esplanade car park in Seaford requires an upgrade to ensure the safety of all users. The upgrade will also further protect the surrounding environment and includes planting more native vegetation.

Work is due to commence in early 2020 and will take around four weeks to completed. The upgrade work will consist of:

  • Installing new hand railing
  • Bitumising the current path where required
  • Installing a low rock edging on the dune side of the path to reduce clay and sand washing onto the path
  • Installing a set of concrete steps at the bottom of the path for smooth access to the beach
  • Planting native vegetation

At times during the construction, the path will be closed and users will be advised to use alternate beach access, located a short walking distance further south.

For more information, please view the concept plan located in the document library. You can also ask a question about this project below.

We may need to gather information to answer your query, but will endevour to reply within 48 hours.

Please note, that we monitor questions during workings hours only, Monday to Fridays. 


We will answer your queries as soon as we can.

Ajax loader transparent
Didn't receive confirmation?
Seems like you are already registered, please provide the password. Forgot your password? Create a new one now.
  • The current west facing wall has eroded at the northern end will that also be fixed ? The end of the ramp was recently fixed, why are concrete steps being used to replace it, when past concrete steps have not been successful at the base of other ramps ? And will there be a hand rail for the stairs ? The ramp is only just wide enough for people with boards to pass each other, will the low rock wall for erosion reduce the width and become a hazard if it has an uneven surface face ?

    Deborah Bowley asked 16 days ago

    Hello and thanks for your questions.

    The Beach Access project does not include repairs to the erosion scar at the northern end of the rock pitched wall.  The rock pitching structure itself, although currently functional, is not an appropriate method for managing cliff erosion from wave attack and at some stage will need to be replaced.  We continuously monitor cliff erosion along the coast and will investigate and implement a more suitable long term solution for this section in the future.

    The bottom of the ramp eroded away during the winter season and left a steep escarpment that was dangerous and difficult to navigate.  The repairs were a temporary solution until we installed the current planned longer term safety improvements.  The most appropriate long term solution for access between the ramp and the beach is concrete steps.  We recently designed and constructed a number of concrete ramps and steps at Maslin Beach and Port Willunga.  These structures are performing well and why this solution will be used at the Aldam Road beach access point and other locations where erosion is impacting safe access from the path to the beach.  The concrete stairs are designed to withstand wave impacts, erosion and undermining of the structure that also results in less maintenance.  We are unaware of locations where concrete steps have not been successful and welcome your feedback so we may inspect them.

    A new handrail will be installed along the full length of the path and the new stair structure.  We will also be extending the stone edging along the edge of the existing path alignment.  The stone edging assists with capturing sediment runoff before it runs over the path (similar to garden edging).  This should not reduce the width of the path.

    We hope this answers your queries.  

    Thanks for being part of Your Say Onkaparinga.


  • Hi, I am concerned about erosion of the cliff face and am concerned that the bitumen path with kerbing will increase water flow and make the problems worse. I was wondering if removing the bitumen and installing a wooden staircase to allow vegetation to stabilise the clay and cliff face has been considered? This option has worked on the cliff at Tiller Drive.

    Surfer asked 26 days ago

    Hello and thanks for your question.

    The path and kerbing is designed to reduce surface erosion on the cliff face as stormwater flowing from the upper slope (above the path) including water falling on the path will collect on the path, flow along the kerb and discharge at the bottom.  This should also reduce water flow over the whole cliff face and subsequently reduce erosion.  

    The rock retaining along the edge of the path captures silt from the upper slope which has caused slipping issues in the past and will assist with establishing vegetation and improve the chance of decreasing erosion on the upper slopes in the future.

    The scope of the project is to renew the path surface and provide additional safety improvements to the existing track.  A timber staircase is a considerable upgrade, requires extensive geotechnical investigation and comes at a very high cost.  The construction impacts on the cliff face could raise new erosion issues and/or exacerbate the existing issues. 

    There is also a desire to maintain the access the current width which provides ease of transporting equipment such as kayaks and surfboards.  Timber stairs would narrow the access and make transportation of equipment more difficult and could also raise other safety issues.

    We hope this answers your queries.

    Thanks for being part of Your Say Onkaparinga.